Timow’s Turf Midyear Report 2017 (Part 1)

WE ARE OFFICIALLY in the midpoint of 2017 and for the past six months, the Philippine media landscape changed faster than anyone could have guessed.

Here on Timow’s Turf, we will focus on the moments that transpired the first half of the year. Welcome to

Welcome to the Turf’s Midyear Report 2017.

Because of the widened rate of deviance that needs to be recorded as possible, this series is divided into three parts. This article marks the first part of the said series.

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COMING BACK: ‘Mr. Oh’ is coming to CLTV 36 tomorrow

Oh Ja Ryong is Coming

“Here Comes Mr. Oh” will be on the small screens once again but this time on a regional-scale broadcaster.

SOMEONE IS COMING tomorrow to CLTV 36.

You may or may not recognize him but Oh Ja-Ryong is coming.

The Koreanovela “Here Comes Mr. Oh” will be back once again, this time to its new home in Jose Abad Santos Avenue (formerly known as Olongapo-Gapan Road) in the City of San Fernando, Pampanga.

For those who are familiar with that show, this is the Koreanovela that premiered on People’s Television (PTV) back in 2014 and re-aired in 2015 as part of their digital TV test broadcast.

While their dubbing from the previous network will carry on to its new yet downsized habitat, their former home ceased airing them due to a very inherent and a very parochial management as they usually giving priority to the President’s activities (which is still practiced even today).

By regional standards, CLTV is very stable and old enough – they are 10 years old, dear readers – to cover their first K-Dramedy. However, unlike Channel 4 that aired at 5:30 p.m., their slated timeslot is definitely ungodly at 1:30 p.m. According to a member of the PHTV Group, this is mainly because of packed primetime of news and features throughout the dedicated region.

Perhaps, the new programming deal proves to the quintessence of the country’s regional broadcasters that it still functions as a spherical laboratory of broadcasting — a place where tinkering and experimenting continue as they are competing with and giving the major national ones some hints.

“Here Comes Mr. Oh” airs Monday to Friday on CLTV 36, available nationwide on Cignal in channel 115.


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Photo courtesy of MBC

“MathDali” pushes “G Diaries” half an hour late

Robi Domingo and the gang will greet tomorrow morning and every Saturday to teach children some new Math skills with MathDali on ABS-CBN.

(Updated as of 1:34 p.m., June 16, 2017)

AS K-12’s inception and implementation are complete in the recently opened school year, an educational program is going to the main channel.

Starting tomorrow, Knowledge Channel’s MathDali will push over former Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources Gina Lopez’s “G Diaries” original time slot by half an hour.

Presented by Robi Domingo, Igi Boy Flores, Vic Robinson and the Agpangan twins (Joj and Jai) from Pinoy Big Brother, the program originally serves as an offering of the educational cable channel’s 17th anniversary last year.

MathDali will trigger sentimentality for the Batang 90s with MathTinik and its admirable cast (Charlie, Sheila Mae, Patricia, Joey & Miss MathTinik) that discusses topics on the primary and intermediate level. However, the new program will tackle new strategies and techniques specifically tackle on the Grade 4 level.

With that, some media critics like Marco Jonathan Rossi and Ed Ching, will arouse (no malice intended) the attention over this development and ask themselves if this move will see the restoration of the dignity of Channel 2 for being child-friendly in the extremely changing age of Philippine television — at least, during the daytime.

MathDali premieres tomorrow, June 17, and airs every Saturday at 8:00 a.m. on ABS-CBN.

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Detailing the “Lupang Hinirang” music videos found on PHTV

[Dedicated to Jenine Shiongshu and the National Historical Commission of the Philippines (NHCP)]

Balik-eskwela na! Tayo’y po magsitayo at awitin natin ang Pambansang Awit.

ANOTHER SCHOOL YEAR has just begun.

Schools around the country usually begin their first day with the flag ceremony. When a teacher moves the hands and/or the accompaniment is played, everyone will stand tall, will face the flagpole and will place their hand over their heart — save those in Scouting and/or CAT uniform as they will salute — and will sing “Lupang Hinirang.”

In television and radio operations, they are required by law (Republic Act 8491) to play it during sign-on and sign-off on their broadcast day. As long as the lyrics, the tempo and the melody are compliantly concerned, when it comes to the visual concept — for television, obviously — it is a different story.

In the spirit of Araw ng Kalayaan as well for next week, Timow’s Turf will tackle over that aspect in detail for each network. Bear in mind that this does count MVs that is aired for seasonal purposes such as Women’s Month provided by the Philippine Commission on Women (PCW) last March. (more…)

Of Radyo Kontra Droga 98.3 FM and of the Anti-Pirate Radio Law

[Requested by Ian Santos]

[DISCLAIMER: This post is neither associated with Radyo Kontra Droga nor with the National Telecommunications Commission. It is for information and educational purposes only.]

Ron Cruz (sitting, in white) is the mastermind behind Radyo Kontra Droga 98.3 FM in Manila. The station was acclaimed as pirated upon receipt from the PHRadio Group.

IS THE WRITING on the wall happening for a pirated radio station?

According to a post shared in the PHRadio Group this past week, a letter from the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) was received dated April 19. However, the originating post from the Facebook account (not as a page) obscured the content of the letter. Members of the group answered it either as a note of final warning or a letter of cease and desist (C&D) order.

Patrick Chin shared this post from Kontra Droga (as an account) showing the letter from the National Telecommunications Commission.

However, the exposed preliminary parts of the letter were given the suspicions. The recipient was addressed to a certain Mr. Ron Cruz who owned “Radyo Kontra Droga” 98.3 FM in Paco, Manila. The e-mail address obviously used those from his actual business, Ultralite Solar Power Hauz, on with the same location, which was promoted in Unang Hirit (GMA) and Bandila (ABS-CBN) more than two years ago.

Delving on the web, the Metro Manila’s FM frequencies are all occupied and 98.3 MHz is not even registered and licensed to permit by the NTC, not given a legitimate franchise from Congress and no publicity was ever recognized to the public.

The Turf reasoned deductively that when their daytime operating hours of the solar panel establishment is done, they would be converted into an underground radio station, commencing daily operation from 9:00 p.m. until the wee hours of the morning.

According to Ian Santos, he believed that they are not classified as a low-power station (≤20 watts) as he estimated the transmission power of 250-500 watts.

In short, they operate a clandestine pirate station. They are illegal under Act No. 3846 and it may interfere their neighbors’ frequencies. In this case, it may affect Home Radio 97.9 and the classical music station DZFE 98.7.

So, how will they stop and taste the arm of the law?

Learn from the news item from UNTV’s Ito Ang Balita last July 8, 2013.

The police and the NTC will raid and padlock the premises and confiscate their equipment. If the erring personnel have been named and have been known, they will be fined 300 pesos and will be sentenced for three months in jail.

In this case, so much for being the die-hard supporters of President Rodrigo Duterte (or DDS) like Mr. Cruz that they can’t even discipline themselves, especially in complying the common broadcast laws. That said, their new slogan upon their hopeful prevailing justice will be taunted vocally, “Kontra droga pa man, pirata pala naman” or possibly place a cardboard written in a permanent marker, “Pirata ako, ‘wag tularan.”

However, the Turf is not done just yet, because we need to share the thoughts on how that anti-pirate radio law is working this year:

It’s lamentable how the said penalty imposed a ridiculous amount and term is fined and served right now since it was passed back then: P 300 before is worth thousands of pesos in today’s terms and three months — classified under arresto mayor — is rather a short sentence for an imprisonment over this nominal delict.

Although the Congress has the constitutional right to amend the existing law to impose even more stiff penalties on radio piracy, the author thinks that they have to serve progressively up to prision correcional (up to six years).

Nevertheless, the monitoring of unexpected happenings in the radio spectrum shall not cease after this case is solved.


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Photos courtesy of Facebook. Screenshot courtesy of the author.

Lakbai to premiere Sunday on TV5

Presidential son Sebastian “Baste” Duterte (right) is going to test the waters on showbiz/TV industry with Bogart the Explorer (left) and remaining three on their travel reality show, Lakbai, premiering this Sunday on TV5.

AFTER PBA this Sunday, a new travel reality show will act a comfort food after the hard court action.

Enter Lakbai.

The name of this new show is based primarily on the contraction of the Visayan phrase “laktaw ta, bai,” meaning, “let’s walk, friend” as it is, secondarily, a play of lakbay (travel).

As the etymology implies, it will be presented with the mix of Tagalog and Bisaya – something that the audience wanted to see in a new light and understanding.

Presented by presidential son and surfer Sebastian “Baste” Duterte, he is also joined by Internet sensation Bogart the Explorer, with three of Baste’s closest friends: Atty. Alexis “Mr. Good Vibes” Lumbatan, his best friend since kindergarten, Sboi Malicay and Andrei Apostol, the creative and designated videographer.

Although they will compete with their institutional magazine shows such as Kapuso Mo, Jessica Soho and Rated K, their format will be “light and casual.” But this show will last 8 weeks, classifying and considering therefore as a by-installment TV special rather than a permanent series, just like Trip ni Kris last April.

Throughout this show, they will show the viewers their extensive bonds by the spirit of fun, camaraderie and passion for travel.

For Baste, they will discover his humanly adventurous personality in interacting the locals. In addition, it will be the decisive test on whether his first foray will lead to potential showbiz stardom.

However, for critics, it would count it as an indirect and considerable proof of utang na loob to the network as they were deemed favorable to his father’s administration, especially the hiring of their employees into his government from the network’s news department.

Speaking of indirect favoritism, Baste’s publicity to showbiz is nothing new as recent Presidents’ family members did:

  • During the previous administration, former President Noynoy Aquino’s nephew, Bimby, began his showbiz exposure with the backing from his mother, Kris.
  • Before joining politics, Mikey Arroyo began his acting stint in the big screen from 1996 as the then-Senator’s son and continued until the early years of his mother’s tenure in 2005. 
  • Jinggoy Estrada, the son of former President and current Manila mayor Joseph Estrada, was able to star and to produce few action movies during his father’s time in Malacanang. During his tenure as Senator, he was starred in four films and a teleserye cameo during his tenure as a senator from 2004 to 2016, all of them made prior to the Napoles pork barrel scam.

Nevertheless, whatever side we belong, best of luck for Baste and his friends on his first TV sortie.


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Photo courtesy of Inquirer.net

That Thing Called Dubbing (and Why Some People Hated It)

[Requester: Albert Brian Gimao (2nd time). Before introducing the article, personally and seriously, this topic may have been familiar to everyone and The Turf won’t budge further into it.]

The Legend of the Blue Sea is a K-drama that is currently on the air on ABS-CBN since yesterday. It airs every weekday at 5:00 p.m. (Metro Manila) and the following 9:30 a.m. (for RNGs).

AS WE are in the final three-and-a-half weeks of summer vacation*, most of the children who are done with their summer workshops are trying to find some entertainment back into the living room.

When somebody had an interesting show to look forward to, he or she will tune the TV. However, after watching for a few minutes, they feel uncomfortable, scratch their heads and ask themselves: “Bakit Tinatagalog ang palabas ko?”

That thing is called dubbing.

Currently, on free TV, the genres that commonly employ that form of include:

  • cartoons (including anime) (Big 3),
  • Koreanovelas (Big 2 and PTV),
  • US TV series (TV5) and
  • Foreign flicks whether Hollywood (Big 3) or Eastern (GMA) films

However, this annoyance is further summoned to the social media battlefield with two major camps – those who are in favor of dubbing and those against it. Those who are in middle ground are deemed in the backlash zone and whatever side one belongs, they will always lead in the wantonness of civility through trade of tirades.

Japan’s dorayaki and our hopia may taste good but they are obviously not the same delicacy.

If you fit in the requester’s shoes, you will definitely gnash your teeth with a common motive. They accused the Filipino (Tagalog) dubbing for “dumbing down” the integrity and culture behind the program. Languages, indeed, define and distinguish the cultures of different group of people. For example, do you remember watching the anime classic Doraemon and find stumbled of what his favorite food is? In its original Japanese, it is called dorayaki (a pastry filled with red beans) but here in the Philippines, we translated it as hopia — a rough counterpart when it comes to texture and taste, but it is not the same.

What will happen if you switch on the defender’s shoes? Their counterclaims dared the rival to answer the questions such as “Paano mo yan maiintidihan ng mga tao?” (How can people understand it) or added with a rebuttal like “Hindi kakagat ‘yan ng masa.” (It will not be consumed by the masses). Sometimes, they also make anti-intellectual and irrational backlash such as “nosebleed.”

Last January, James Ty III already made an entry on his blog Streak Shooter, detailing this issue expounding his favorite topic, particularly on films that aired on his favorite day, Sunday, over the Big 2 and later nag such things on his Twitter to one user. He observed that other countries, aside from USA using Spanish, have done the same method.

His justification is elaborated and excerpted:

“In the past, these networks would air their movies in original English audio but dubbing them has been a way for them to attract viewers especially with the proliferation of locally produced soap operas…

Networks like GMA and TV5 air these dubbed movies as a way to save money especially with their locally produced shows not rating well and getting cancelled, resulting in huge financial losses. Dubbers are also paid the same rates as those who dub the Korean, Spanish and Japanese anime shows.”

He concluded that if “they can’t beat them, join them…” but that will not do for those who persistently resist.

Is there a solution to subside the hatred of dubbing?

Well, yes. There is already a closed-captioning law that took effect last July — Republic Act 10905.

However, without its implementing rules and regulations (IRR) that needs to be crafted by concerning associations and relatable government agencies — in this case, those from Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT)  —  they cannot be materialized at once.

If the IRR is ratified, there will be in-house layoff on dubbers and/or transfers into subtitle typists. In financial perspective, it will improve their networks from being economically burdensome; such an upshot will mean more dividends for shareholders and more investment for their maintenance and expansion.

Until that day comes, better watch it on an online streaming site for the original language but if you don’t have one, tough luck. Perhaps, we should not be surprised if some network has the guts to acquire and dub the sensational and controversial Netflix series 13 Reasons Why.


*The dating is based on the academic calendar for Academic Year 2017-18 released by the Department of Education (DepEd). Their classes begin on June 5. Private schools may not need to follow the required date to open their classes but they mustn’t start after August.


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[Photos courtesy of BoxAsian/SBS/Wikimedia Commons]

Philippines Football League both to kick out UFL, off tomorrow

The new and legit national professional football league was launched last April 21 at Shangri-La at the Fort in Taguig City.

THE IDENTITY CRISIS and legitimacy of our national, top-tier and professional football (soccer) league is finally over.
Beginning tomorrow, the new (and de jure) league called Philippines Football League (PFL) will kick out the de facto United Football League (UFL) in the early 2010s.
What went wrong with the latter league? Are there any changes in the competition? What will be the inaugural game plan? Who will be the broadcaster?

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Radyo ng Bayan to get an AM makeover this June

[Requested by Jared Kenneth Ferrer]

Beginning June 1, Radyo ng Bayan (DZRB 738 kHz in Metro Manila) will become RP1.

RADYO NG BAYAN is getting a cosmetic makeover next month.

Beginning June 1, the branding of DZRB-AM 738 kHz (for Metro Manila) will be face-lifted as RP1.

The initials RP — a former two-letter initial for the formal name of our country — actually stands for Radyo Pilipinas, which also shares the name of their overseas shortwave radio station.

This move is part of Martin Andanar’s master reorganization plan for the state-owned media; it is obviously patterned after their FM counterparts: FM2 (DWBR) 104.3 MHz and the upcoming FM1 87.5.

Using that logical reasoning, the remaining stations under their current holding agency, Philippine Broadcasting Service (PBS), might treat the current Sports Radio DZSR 918 as RP2 and Radyo Magasin DZRM 1278 as RP3. The Turf’s aforementioned deductive renaming is speculative until Andanar himself will officially announce the rebranding balance.

With such identity change impending, one of their programs will be in the big question. Will the all-out simulcast of Radyobisyon — since 2014 — be affected over that renaming row? Mostly not, as it will just be a cosmetic change over the master script.

Aside from Radyobisyon, Ben Tulfo, a very popular TV and radio personality yet a rock-solid President Duterte apologist that has a significant fandom of its online counterparts, will reportedly have his own eponymous show “unfiltered” this month.

Despite that move and the reorganization under the proposed yet potentially lasting People’s Broadcasting Corporation (PBC), their services will remain the same when it comes to delivering pro-administration news not just only the Palace’s press conferences but also acts as the driver of initiatives from their government agencies.

In short, they are still publishing political propaganda whatever the sitting President pleases, which is a contradiction of their master plan of turning their media to be editorially independent and credible.

Such prime example was the #RealNumbersPH forum yesterday. They clarified the related significant figures from the concerned agencies regarding the War on Drugs and the associated extrajudicial killings (EJKs) such as the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA), Philippine National Police (PNP), Department of Health (DOH) and the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) from “fake numbers” that was reported on the common media outlets for 10 months.

That being said, the step of renaming Radyo ng Bayan into RP1 will not affect their generally established taste and preference of AM frequency listenership either on a short or on a long term.


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Photo courtesy of PBS/RadioNowOnline.com

Xiao Time to bow out of PTV

Historian Xiao Chua aired the 639th episode of Xiao Time on PTV earlier this afternoon and this evening. At that moment, the network’s management announced the segment pullout after four and a half years.

HISTORIAN and ACADEMICIAN Michael Charleston Briones Chua a.k.a. Xiao Chua will bow out of PTV without anticipation after 641 editions of his Xiao Time segment on PTV News this week.

Announced Tuesday, he respected the decision of the pullout from the network’s management. His current episode was the history of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) as a run-up to its summit — being as a host country for the region’s Golden Jubilee — in Metro Manila this weekend.

Xiao Time was given a lease from Channel 4 on their afternoon and evening news program — as News @ 1 and News @ 6 — during the latter half of the (Noynoy) Aquino administration. Not only a patch of their respective newscasts can he be seen, he was also a guest presenter with Kathy San Gabriel during the live commemoration of historical events (e.g. Araw ng Kalayaan, Rizal Day, etc.) during the said presidency.

His unexpected news after four and a half years coincidentally happened on the same part of the day the Supreme Court handed down the unexpected ruling, favoring the continuation of construction of Torre de Manila. The controversial building that obstructed the skyline of the Rizal Park in Luneta was the center of attention after a few years of standoff between his Knights of Rizal and the erring construction company, DMCI.

Xiao has no hard feelings on what considered to be his double whammy today and this week. What comes on his future after PTV will be his choice in life — whether completing graduate studies, teaching in universities, holding seminars or creating an online series — and it must be respected.

In this post-truth era, TV enthusiasts and critics are now questioning what comes next for Visayas Avenue and their news departments as the vacant slot might be used in favor of the President Rodrigo Duterte’s lackeys and facts, arising from science and history, are deemed irrelevant in shaping up public policy and how to present them like Xiao did as academicians are in the crosshairs by irrational and wild fanatics in the social media ready to be shot down.

Who knows?


And that was the makasaysayang story of Xiao Time. *mic drop*

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Photo courtesy of ABS-CBN News